The Talmud on Eclipses

Here is the only section I have found in the Babylonian Talmud which discuses eclipses (note that the phrase that is translated “lights are in eclipse” is literally comparable to “lights are stricken”):

Torah Reading, Week 4: “And He Appeared…”

This week’s Torah reading is Vayeira (וַיֵּרָ֤א—”And he appeared”) Genesis 18:1-22:24. It includes the promise that Sarah would have a son, Isaac or Yitzak—a boy named “laughter” because Sarah (who was 90 in the biblical narrative) laughed when she heard it. I suppose, in this regard, he could have easily been called named Yivkeh, “weeping”.

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Getting Caught Up On Paul

There’s a lot going on with Pauline studies in the theological world (as if that’s anything new). It can really be difficult to keep up with in terms of reading. N.T. Wright’s latest work, Paul and the Faithfulness of God, has over 1700 pages!  If you’re interested in a brief synopsis where things are concerning Pauline studies from Wright’s perspective, …

The Prophets & an Emotional God

I recently began a re-reading of Abraham Heschel’s classic work, The Prophets, as part of personal research on the idea of “the weakness of God”.  I first read Heschel as part of a undergrad class on the prophets of the Hebrew scriptures.  The class was very small, consisting of only four or five of us.  Through reading Heschel’s work and our personal, …

Theological Discussions at the Doyle House

I came across this old post from 2008, and I enjoyed remembering it so much that I had to repost it.  (Please note that my children are older, but the conversations haven’t necessarily changed that much.) The following is from 2008: So I walk into the living room and overhear the end of an apparently deep theological discussion among my …

Eight

His finger cut through the sand and dirt.   It wasn’t the first time he had seen his finger write in the the flesh of the earth.   On the mountain he had written the words in the stone.  He had given them to his people, those he had chosen to make his own.  Words that were meant for life. And this is what they had …