Category Archives: Biblical Studies

The New Yorker on Everett Fox and Bible Translation

The New Yorker on Everett Fox and Bible Translation

Really good article in the New Yorker about Everett Fox’s fantastic (in my opinion) translations of the Hebrew scriptures.  I have yet to read another translator who has so accurately captured the feel of the Hebrew text. While some have criticized the English of Fox’s work, I think (with others) that a text from a foreign language and culture should continue to feel foreign even in translation.  One of the aspects of meaning is the world of the source language. Continue reading

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Biblical Hebrew Classes

Biblical Hebrew Classes

I’m excited for the upcoming online classes on biblical hebrew.  If you are interested, there are three class opportunities each week: Mondays 9pm-10pm, Thursdays 6am-7am, Fridays 12pm-1pm.  There are a couple of spaces left in each of the Monday and Thursday sessions, and only one in the Friday sessions.  Drop me a line if you would like to be included or would like more info.

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Geza Vermes Lecture on DSS

“The Story of the Dead Sea Scrolls, a lecture presented by Professor Geza Vermes at Louisiana State University’s Hill Memorial Library on September 29, 2009. Geza Vermes was born at Mako in Hungary in 1924. He studied in Budapest and in Louvain (Belgium), where he read Theology and Oriental history and languages, and in 1953 obtained a doctorate with a dissertation on the historical framework of the Dead Sea Scrolls. Now Professor Emeritus of Jewish Studies and Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College, he continues to lecture in Oxford and worldwide.” [Via YouTube]

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Apocalyptic Advent: Luke 2

Apocalyptic Advent: Luke 2

From the Gospel of Luke:

In those days a decree went out from Caesar Augustus that all the world should be registered. This was the first registration when Quirinius was governor of Syria. And all went to be registered, each to his own town. And Joseph also went up from Galilee, from the town of Nazareth, to Judea, to the city of David, which is called Bethlehem, because he was of the house and lineage of David, to be registered with Mary, his betrothed, who was with child. And while they were there, the time came for her to give birth. And she gave birth to her firstborn son and wrapped him in swaddling cloths and laid him in a manger, because there was no place for them in the upper room.

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Apocalyptic Advent: Matthew 1

Apocalyptic Advent: Matthew 1

From the Gospel of Matthew:

  Now the birth of Jesus Christ took place in this way. When his mother Mary had been betrothed to Joseph, before they came together she was found to be with child from the Holy Spirit. And her husband Joseph, being a just man and unwilling to put her to shame, resolved to divorce her quietly. But as he considered these things, behold, an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream, saying, “Joseph, son of David, do not fear to take Mary as your wife, for that which is conceived in her is from the Holy Spirit. She will bear a son, and you shall call his name Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins.”

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Apocalyptic Advent: Revelation 12

Apocalyptic Advent: Revelation 12

From the Apocalypse of John:

Then God’s temple in heaven was opened, and the ark of his covenant was seen within his temple. There were flashes of lightning, rumblings, peals of thunder, an earthquake, and heavy hail.

And a great sign appeared in heaven: a woman clothed with the sun, with the moon under her feet, and on her head a crown of twelve stars. She was pregnant and was crying out in birth pains and the agony of giving birth.

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Apocalyptic Advent: Luke 1

Apocalyptic Advent: Luke 1

The Gospel of Luke records a revelatory and visionary event that happened in the life of a young Jewish girl name Miriam (Mary), who lived in the northern hill country of Judea,  called “the Galil” (Galilee).  The Jewish people have been conquered, occupied, and oppressed by the Romans for about 40 years when this event takes place:

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